Showing all posts tagged mobile:

Five Best Practices for Creating Meaningful Mobile Engagement



Engaging customers via their mobile devices is an exciting proposition for many organizations; however, it has to be done with care. These solutions often carry a significant cost and depend on a Return on Investment (ROI) model to make sense.

Achieving this ROI requires walking a fine line between meaningful engagement and being a nuisance. Here are five best practices to help you do that.



5 ways to ensure your mobile strategy works

1. Think big picture

The goal is to create a user experience that provides vast amounts of data to the organization while delivering value to the customer. Accomplishing that means the experience needs to be immersive and omni-channel (e.g., SMS, email, app-based, digital signage, direct mail, etc.).

Too many organizations jump straight to the mobile application without realizing adoption of mobile applications is low and retention of those mobile apps is even lower. A holistic approach that embraces the web (traditional and mobile), mobile apps, digital and physical signage, and some of the emerging areas such as augmented reality (AR) and context-aware chatbots will be far more successful.

Analytics and business intelligence tools must be included because understanding the success of these messages and their impact on the bottom line is a necessity, as engagement attempts that are ill-received may create a negative effect on the business.

2. Establish a baseline

Before rolling out any new engagement solution or even a single targeted campaign, it is important to understand the baseline. What is normal for a specific time of day, day of week, demographic, location, etc.

If there are areas in which these baselines are unknown, the success of an engagement will also likely be unknown. The length of time to determine a credible baseline depends on business and vertical; however, a month of data will provide statistically valuable data for many organizations.

3. Consider your social credibility

Each engagement or touchpoint with the user must be carefully weighed prior to being implemented, as the organization is spending “social credibility" with the customer in issuing these engagements. Determining that a message is hitting the right person at the right time and place is paramount to success.

While the organization may want to drive a specific behavior, it must be done in such a way that it is graciously accepted by the recipient. For less important messages, consider other channels for delivery—email, direct mail and digital signage integrations are options that are less invasive than a targeted push message.

4. Leverage employee engagement

Business should ensure the human component isn’t lost in this digital marketing frenzy.

Consider a scenario in which an employee could be notified when a user has spent more than five minutes in front of a specific retail display or there has been a high density of users in line for a drink at a sports game or concert venue. Rather than trying to ping users to have them go find another bar, consider triggers that have an employee come over with a mobile payment system and perform line-breaking transactions. This human component may still be considered a “digital engagement," but it won’t feel like it to the consumer.

5. Keep it fresh

Digital engagements should always be timely and relevant. Organizations can’t afford to be lazy about managing these platforms because pushing irrelevant messages will drive away customers, cause them to remove their mobile apps, and even consider competitors.

Campaigns should also create a sense of urgency—create a fear of missing out or at least ensure customers understand this immediate deal is good for only the first 100 redemptions.

Gamification is one way to keep things interesting for consumers, and it can drive additional spend as it may promise “bonus" rewards for the additional engagement. The solutions should be simple enough that they can be managed by marketing teams and not IT.

Originally posted here with Network World. Republished with permission as originating author. Also available on my LinkedIn page.



The Spark of Innovation


This week was one of those weeks where I had the opportunity to witness one of the most personally rewarding things in my job and the greatest reason that I do what I do - I saw that spark that lit up my customer's world. We were sharing a narrative of how we could go about providing mobile analytics and business intelligence for our customer. The directors that we were presenting to immediately got what could be accomplished and we were off to the races discussing possible scenarios, story arcs, etc. We were shortly joined by a VP of Operations and the company's Owner who had been asked to join us by their colleagues. Our collective team spent the better part of the next hour and a half hashing out the details of what would make this a successful endeavor. Everyone left the meeting on a natural high sparked by the excitement of innovation and the opportunity to disrupt competition in a major way.

That spark and these moments embody EVOTEK and why I believe so strongly that we are truly bringing something new to our customers. Thank you for everyone in that meeting for creating something truly memorable.



The Rise of the Machine Learning Solutions



Heading into Aruba Atmosphere this year I was most excited to see Aruba’s new Niara solution in action and learn more about this product as it solves a very real need in every network. Inherently any network policy grants some sort of access to the network and users are free to work within the confines of that policy. Even using 802.1X-based authentication and dynamically provisioned VLANs, access roles, downloadable ACLs, etc. isn’t necessarily enough. Niara solves for these issues in an appealing way and lessens the workloads for SecOps teams.

Case #1: Stolen Credentials
A known valid user can operate within their policy, but what happens if they are compromised either through social engineering, weak passwords, poor password management, etc.? Niara builds a profile of what is typical behavior of a specific user, if their patterns change this will be identified by the system. Perhaps the user starts attempting to access new areas or is visiting new websites—by a change in behavior, it is possible to identify a need for a change in policy, alert the SecOps team, or eventually automate remediation or lockdown of the user. Comparing to a baseline as well as other similar users gives Niara a frame of reference for the user under evaluation.

Case #2: Malware and Viruses
Both malware and viruses are capable of changing the behavior of network attached clients, while numerous tools already exist to help combat these Niara could serve as a welcome tool to identify and isolate infected clients or in a perfect world learn about how a Day Zero Attack might attempt to compromise the network and automatically harden the network in anticipation of this attack. The combination of these capabilities along with Aruba’s open APIs using Aruba’s Exchange offers some very interesting possibilities by enabling the collection of data from ecosystem partners with a greater speciality in the malware and virus arena. Imagine a world in which your firewall vendor has detected a new type of malware, shares that data with Aruba ClearPass and Niara via APIs, syslog, SIEM, or other similar routes and then the network automatically reacts to prevent the spread of that malware at the same time you are being notified.

Case #3: Software Bugs/Anomalous Behavior
If an application is updated and begins to operate differently on the network, Niara can identify this and enable teams to understand the new behavior. New behaviors deemed as risky can be mitigated against and feedback can be provided to the company’s development team. A specific example of this was provided at the conference in a popular file share company who’s update generated unwanted traffic on the network. Niara’s machine learning was able to identify and allow this undesirable behavior to be stopped.

Aruba, a Hewlett Packard Enterprise Company opens the door to a world of possibilities with the addition of machine learning and extends those capabilities elegantly through their open architecture in Aruba Exchange. I would anticipate that this field of machine learning is going to explode in the networking world as IT teams are facing increasingly difficult security challenges and are being asked to do more with less people and less resources. Automation of detection and defense should be able to solve 75-80% of the issues out there, enabling IT to focus on the most challenging and highest value problems out there.

Investing in Others


February is an exciting month this year as there are two of my favorite conferences held back to back weeks—Wireless LAN Pros Conference in Phoenix, AZ and then Aruba Atmosphere in Nashville, TN. This year I have opted to present at the WLPC conference on the WLAN Engineer’s role in Digital Disruption and was invited to participate in the Tech Field Day live panel for Atmosphere. I have allocated a portion of my weekends in preparing for these events to ensure that I do my best and that the group benefits from the time that I have been allocated. Despite this being my third year doing these events, I am always amazed how much I learn from preparing to teach others. My goals for these two events for this year are the following:

Keeping it Simple
We have a varied demographic at these events, so one of my goals is to explain the content in a simple way without “dumbing it down". I’ve found this to be a great source of my own personal learning as I need to ensure that I fully understand the topic first to do so without destroying what it is that I am trying to get across.

Share Perspective
Everyone that attends these events comes from a different background and has their own life experiences that contribute to their value base and their viewpoints. I strive to share my perspective in my presentations and when I have the opportunity to field questions or discuss the content, learn from others perspectives.

Challenge Others
My first presentations were the result of Keith Parsons challenging people to step up and share. There are guys who present on some amazing technical material and it can be intimidating, however real world experience is what these conferences are all about and sharing experiences either through a presentation, through the questions that get asked, or even social discussions at the bar are welcome.

I look forward to the discussions ahead and both sharing with and learning from the other attendees.